Tag Archives: Flower

Echeveria derenbergii – magic rose in stone garden


Echeveria can be evergreen succulent perennials or subshrubs with rosettes of colourful, fleshy leaves and racemes or panicles of urn-shaped flowers

E. derenbergii is an evergreen succulent with rosettes of obovate, whitish-green leaves and one-sided racemes of small cup-shaped red and yellow flowers opening from late winter to summer

Common Name: painted lady
Family: Crassulaceae
Color flower: Red and Yellow in Spring, Summer and Winter
Hardiness: H2 (tender – cool or frost-free greenhouse)
Color foliage: Green and White in Autumn, Spring, Summer and Winter
Height: Up to 10 cm
Habit: Bushy
Habit: May be attacked by mealybugs, vine weevil and aphids
Pruning: No pruning required
Spreadid: North-facing
Time to ultimate height: 2-5 years
Exposure: Grow under glass in a standard cactus compost, in full light. Provide low humidity. Water freely when in growth and keep just moist at other times. Apply a dilute low nitrogen fertilizer fortnightly during late spring and summer. Keep almost dry in the winter. Stand plants outside during the summer months
Garden characteristics: Patio/Container Plants

Convolvulus cneorum


Convolvulus can be annuals, perennials or shrubs, erect or scrambling, with simple or palmately divided leaves and solitary or clustered, open funnel-shaped flowers

C. cneorum is a small spreading evergreen shrub to 60cm in height, with narrowly oblong, very silvery leaves and funnel-shaped white flowers tinged pink in bud, up to 4cm in width

Common Name: silverbush
Family: Convolvulaceae
Color flower: Pink and White in Spring and Summer
Hardiness: H4 (hardy – average winter)
Color foliage: Grey/Silver in Autumn, Spring, Summer and Winter
Height: 0.5-1 metres
Habit: Bushy
Habit: Generally pest free
Pruning: Pruning group 8
Spreadid: West-facing
Time to ultimate height: 5-10 years
Exposure: Grow in well drained soil or low to moderate fertility, in a sheltered spot with full sun. Good for containers, using a gritty loam based medium, watering well in the growing season, but keeping drier in winter
Garden characteristics: Drought Resistant, Patio/Container Plants, Mediterranean Climate Plants, City/Courtyard Gardens or Gravel Garden

Iris ‘Sheila Ann Germaney’ (Reticulata)


Iris may be rhizomatous or bulbous perennials, with narrowly leaves and erect stems bearing flowers with 3 large spreading or pendent fall petals, alternating with 3 erect, often smaller, standard petals, in late winter, spring or early summer

Reticulata irises are small, bulbous perennials with narrow leaves almost square in section, and solitary, sometimes fragrant purple, yellow or blue flowers in early spring

‘Sheila Ann Germaney’ is a dwarf bulbous plant with pale blue flowers in late winter, the falls with a yellow midrib and darker grey-blue veining

Common Name: iris ‘Sheila Ann Germaney’
Family: Iridaceae
Color flower: Pale Blue in Spring
Hardiness: old H4 (hardy)
Color foliage: Green in Spring
Height: Up to 10 cm
Habit: Bushy
Habit: Susceptible to damage by slugs and snails
Pruning: No pruning required
Spreadid: South-facing
Time to ultimate height: 2-5 years
Exposure: Grow in well-drained neutral or slightly alkaline soil
Garden characteristics: City/Courtyard Gardens, Coastal, Cottage/Informal Garden or Flower borders and beds

Wonderful spring tree peoni

We have already written about nice plants – tree peonies.27jo5dhXzqs

Today I would like to share some new photos of this wonderful flower.

Tree peonies can be different colors. This flowers are so bright and beautiful!

However some of peonies does not look great after rains.

 

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Tree peonies were first cultivated 2,000 years ago in China from wild plants found growing in rocky places exposed to harsh extremes of temperature. The plants have also been bred since the 8th century in Japan, which has a climate similar to Britain.

There is no shortage of varieties, both single and double, in a wide range of colours. Providing they are planted properly, they are not at all demanding or difficult to grow.

Tree peonies do best in a sunny spot with rich, well-drained soil that is neither strongly acidic (above pH 5.5) nor prone to getting waterlogged. Sufficient depth is crucial. Japanese tree peonies, which are all grafted onto herbaceous rootstock, must be planted with the graft union about 6in (15cm) into the soil in order to develop into a substantial, healthy-looking plant.

Even when the tree is properly planted, you might have to wait a while for the best blooms as it can take up to four years to establish. It is common for no blooms to appear at all in the second season.

But do not despair: feed the tree with a sprinkling of organic fish, blood and bone mixture, prune out any dead wood and the remains of the previous year’s growth in spring, and in the meantime enjoy the delicate, deep-cut foliage. When the blooms come they will be worth the wait.

There are plenty of tree peony varieties to choose from: Paeonia rockii (formerly known as ‘Rock’s Variety’) has a blackcurrant blotch at the base of pure white petals and is one of the most desirable varieties; until recently it was terribly rare. Hybrids of P. suffruticosa are available in all shades of pink from the delicate, shell-tinged “Haru-no-akebono” to the rich purple “Cardinal Vaughan”. For fresh yellows go for P. ludlowii, with its single, canary blooms, or frillier cultivars such as “Golden Isles” and P. x lemoinei “High Noon”.

One of the most striking varieties, which was looking especially beautiful on my recent visit to Monet’s garden in Giverny, is P. x lemoinei “Souvenir de Maxime Cornu”, which has double, pale apricot blooms with a brownish edge to the petals. The only problem, as with many double varieties, is that the weight of the flowers, especially after rain, causes them to hang down and be hidden among the foliage.

To make a virtue out of this failing, consider planting it in a raised position, such as at the top of a flight of steps, where the blooms can still be enjoyed at their best.

 

Pasque Flower – spring magic

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Iris foetidissima – unusual plant


Iris may be rhizomatous or bulbous perennials, with narrowly leaves and erect stems bearing flowers with 3 large spreading or pendent fall petals, alternating with 3 erect, often smaller, standard petals, in late winter, spring or early summer

I. foetidissima is an evergreen perennial to 80cm, with glossy rich green leaves and small, yellow-tinged, dull purple flowers followed by large pods opening to show bright orange-red seeds, which persist into winter

Common Name: stinking iris
Family: Iridaceae
Color flower: Purple and Yellow in Summer
Hardiness: H5 (hardy – cold winter)
Color foliage: Green in Autumn, Spring, Summer and Winter
Height: 0.5-1 metres
Habit: Clump-forming
Habit: Prone to slugs, snails and thrips
Pruning: Remove any dying foliage in autumn
Spreadid: North-facing
Time to ultimate height: 2-5 years
Exposure: Grow in well-drained, neutral to slightly acid loam but will tolerate most soils in full sun, partial shade or shade
Garden characteristics: Cottage/Informal Garden, Flower borders and beds, Underplanting of Roses and Shrubs, Wildlife Gardens or Low Maintenance

Saponaria ocymoides – simple and nice


Saponaria can be annuals or perennials, with opposite, entire leaves and small clusters of pink or purple flowers in summer

S. ocymoides is a vigorous mat-forming perennial to 8cm in height, with small semi-evergreen ovate leaves and loose clusters of pink flowers 10mm in width

Common Name: tumbling Ted
Family: Caryophyllaceae
Color flower: Pink in Summer
Hardiness: H5 (hardy – cold winter)
Color foliage: Green in Autumn, Spring, Summer and Winter
Height: Up to 10 cm
Habit: Mat forming
Habit: Slugs and snails may be a problem
Pruning: Cut back hard after flowering to maintain compact habit
Spreadid: North-facing
Time to ultimate height: 2-5 years
Exposure: Grow in moderately fertile, well-drained, neutral to alkaline soil in full sun
Garden characteristics: Gravel Garden, Patio/Container Plants or Rock Garden

Colchicum ‘Waterlily’ – Autumn Flowers


Colchicum are cormous perennials with usually coarse, broadly strap-shaped leaves which appear with or after the goblet-shaped flowers

‘Waterlily’ is a cormous perennial to 12cm in height in flower, with fully double lilac-pink flowers about 8cm in length. Strap-shaped leaves appear after the flowers

Common Name: meadow saffron ‘Waterlily’
Family: Colchicaceae
Color flower: Pink in Autumn
Hardiness: H5 (hardy – cold winter)
Color foliage: Green in Spring
Height: Up to 10 cm
Habit: Columnar/Upright
Habit: May be damaged by slugs
Pruning: No pruning required
Spreadid: South-facing
Time to ultimate height: 2-5 years
Exposure: Grow in moist but well-drained, deep, humus-rich, fertile soil. Intolerant of waterlogging
Garden characteristics: Cottage/Informal Garden, Patio/Container Plants, Rock Garden or Underplanting of Roses and Shrubs